Audi Quattro.

Post pics of your car in here
4v6
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Re: Audi Quattro.

Post by 4v6 » Thu Jul 15, 2010 11:48 am

Ive been addressing the rusted out jacking points and consequential rust damage on the passenger side this week.

Almost an exact replication of the drivers side with similar work needing to be performed.
I decided early on to cut out the inner sill (into the passenger cell) so as to access the sills interior stiffeners which had suffered from rust and jack up damage.
Having repaired that i set about welding it all up and i should be done on that later today ready to do the rear portion and the final bit of welding on the passenger arch.
DSCF0141.JPG
Action shot of me welding as the rest is pretty boring stuff.
DSCF0141.JPG (74.73 KiB) Viewed 2921 times
Tony Warren. GC #96.

4v6
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Re: Audi Quattro.

Post by 4v6 » Fri Jul 16, 2010 12:26 pm

I spent most all of yesterday welding, fitting and grinding steel to get this front passenger sill/jacking point/inner sill area repaired and strengthened.
Linishing the welds down can take a while but the result is far better than just leaving them.
I finished up last night by degreasing the whole area and painting it with a product i really rate- POR15.
Its an anti rust, air drying primer thats as hard as nails- literally, i cannot praise it enough for its tenacious grip on the bare metal and its resistance to chipping, very impressed and very happy with how its gone.
DSCF0168.JPG
Inner sill, showing removed panel refitted and painted.
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DSCF0171.JPG
All rusted material removed and repaired then painted to preserve it ready for underseal and seam sealer applications.
DSCF0171.JPG (108.98 KiB) Viewed 2889 times
Tony Warren. GC #96.

Guy Croft
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Re: Audi Quattro.

Post by Guy Croft » Fri Jul 16, 2010 12:41 pm

MODEL POST!

It is very interesting to watch this careful reconstruction, step by step. Thanks Tony bfor taking the trouble to illustrate and describe what you're doing. I does take a long time to 'write up' and so few seem to bother.

GC

4v6
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Re: Audi Quattro.

Post by 4v6 » Sat Nov 06, 2010 10:37 pm

Slow progress but inevitably getting there on this one.

The majority of the welding is now finished with only some minor patching to finish up on, then i can start the body prep work, that in itself will likely take some time to get right.
Since i finished the welding, painting and seam sealing weeks ago i finally got to use the waxoyl sprayer.
All the enclosed box sections have been flooded, chassis rails also, even though they showed no signs of corrosion.
cannot be too careful and wont do any harm i think to make sure, thats if i want it to last another 30 years.

Some photos of the reconstruction of the rear passenger wheel arch which turned out to be far more involved than orginally envisaged.
P1000809 (1000 x 750).jpg
Passenger arch and sill required extensive work.
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P1000808 (1000 x 750).jpg
Same area different viewpoint.
All rusted material removed and replaced.
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Patch repair proved to be difficult but ultimately worthwhile.
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Inner arch skin also needed repair as rust had crept between the inner and outer flanges.
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Offering it up and preparing to tack it in.
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P1000871 (1000 x 750).jpg
Welded inner skin with repair patch fitted.
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Outer patch repair welded in (mostly) and connected to the inner skin also. Very much stronger now.
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I also completed the fabrication of the rear set of brake shields i started.
P1010086 (1000 x 750).jpg
Full set of parts that would be otherwise impossible to source, made by hand in England!
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Engine and gearbox are also fully fitted ( not wired or plumbed though) with a brake vacuum servo replacing the original hydraulic monstrosity that fails with monotonous regularity being test fitted.
As it happens, it bolts right in with some minor alterations to the pushrod length being necessary (shortening).

Theres still a fair bit left on this one, but i will get to drive it eventually im sure.
Tony Warren. GC #96.

4v6
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Re: Audi Quattro.

Post by 4v6 » Thu Jul 21, 2011 2:20 pm

Part's aquisition has gone pretty well considering the cost of some of the item's and the lack of availability of other's, however, I've now got a completed front suspension, fully refurbished with new damper's, all subframe and suspension rubber's fitted and everything painted up.

With all that stuff done I decided to put some effort into the rear subrame and transmission assembly.

Couple of photo's of a little tool I made up for fitting the really awkward antiroll bar end link rubber's, these will drive you insane if you let them as they pop out and refuse to go where they're told to.
P1000266 (1000 x 750).jpg
Consist's of a bolt, a cup, a tube/collar and a large washer.
P1000266 (1000 x 750).jpg (165.16 KiB) Viewed 2381 times
To use this and save yourself a heap of broken fingernail's plus associated bad language, you put the washer on the bolt followed by the rubber to be pressed in, then insert the free end of the bolt into the vacant end of the antirollbar and fit the cup and the nut to hold it all in place.
P1000271 (1000 x 750).jpg
Almost ready to bend it to my will.
P1000271 (1000 x 750).jpg (124.56 KiB) Viewed 2381 times
Then fit the collar/tube over the top of the exposed rubber, pushing the collar into contact with the antirollbar so it bottom's out, which prevent's the rubber from making good it's escape.
Then lubricate the rubber with a suitable grease or other rubber friendly lubricant and tighten the nut and bolt to push the tricky little devil into place.
P1000276 (1000 x 750).jpg
Tightening the nut forces the rubber to go into the antirollbar without drama.
P1000276 (1000 x 750).jpg (138.1 KiB) Viewed 2381 times
Make's it much easier to do and eliminates any risk's to yourself or the component part's.
P1000278 (1000 x 750).jpg
No drama and makes for a nice easy time.
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When I purchased the vehicle I became aware of a rear suspension creak/groan and the occasional doinging noise of a spring trying to do something it shouldn't.
Until now, I only knew that the rear spring's were not what they should have been, being as they were, loose on the strut under full droop and giving a "saggy backside" look to the vehicle when it was on the road.
The reason for the noise's became evident when it was all stripped out a couple of week's ago.

The first problem showed itself and came in the form of the top coil of the spring actually off the spring cap and over the top of it.
P1030075.jpg
Top coil/s are outside of the spring cap.
P1030075.jpg (194.85 KiB) Viewed 2381 times
Followed by it's relative on the other side in worse condition.
The ill fitting spring putting all its stresses into the outer edge's of the spring cap and eventually with the help of good old corrosion, breaking it and fighting it's way out to contact the underside of the strut tower, hence the source of the noise's.
P1030083.jpg
Spring cap broken, ill fitting spring and year's of exposure to weather have not helped.
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This shot show's it a little more dramatically.
P1030088.jpg
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The correct roadspring is on the right in this next shot.
It's important to have the right one's as the top coil's are shaped to sit securely on the cap, not like the "replacement" which is simply round and can move off axis and fracture the cap.
P1030089.jpg
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I found the propshaft centre mount to be well past it's best as well as the suspension top mount's.
P1030124 (1000 x 750).jpg
Propshaft centre bearing due for replacement.
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P1030096.jpg
Top mount bearing's well beyond service life.
P1030096.jpg (163.18 KiB) Viewed 2381 times
My part's collection continues to shrink as the worn item's go back on.
P1030260 (1000 x 750).jpg
Most of these part's have already been fitted to the front, mirrored, as the quattro has essentially the same front and rear suspension setup, so i need double the part's.
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P1030256 (1000 x 750).jpg
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As I type this, the strut's have been freshly painted using POR15 ready for a second coat of chassis black, then I can start on reassembly of it all.
I'll post further update's on that as i go along.
Tony Warren. GC #96.

Brit01
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Re: Audi Quattro.

Post by Brit01 » Thu Jul 21, 2011 2:38 pm

Nice work 4v6. Great looking car.

I love to see new parts all laid out ready to fit. Keep the updates/photos coming.

The cylinder heads can be like Pandora's Box like I discovered when opening up my flat four boxer. You'll always come across the unexpected or never know what you will find.

Good luck

4v6
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Re: Audi Quattro.

Post by 4v6 » Sun Sep 25, 2011 12:56 pm

Thanks Brit01.
Progress report.

I turned my attention to the wiring in of the ecu.
On first sight, it appeared to be a nightmare job, over 50 wires in the loom to go through and to find out which went where.
Considering its a late 1982-early 83 car and the loom and engine going in comes from the big S6 estate from 1995, I thought it would have been very much harder to fathom out.
As it happens there are only 13 wires to actually splice into the car's harness, mostly power feeds, a couple of earths and connections for the oil light etc.
But before I could do any of that I had to try and find a location for the ecu which proved a bit of a nuisance until a position behind the drivers dash air vent exposed itself.
Happy with that I proceeded to repair the monkey induced damage inside the scuttle area created purely by the laziest person on earth surely.
The reason for this carnage was due to an attempt to gain access to the clutch master cylinder without removing the pedal box assembly.
Unfortunately it created plenty of other problems later on with water ingress seizing the steering column bearing, wetting the carpets/wiring etc.
P1030545 (1000 x 750).jpg
This mess was hidden beneath filler.
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Luckily a good friend of mine was in the process of breaking up a coupe GT, which is almost identical apart from the rear floor pan and 4wd system, so I cut the required panel free of that car and used it to produce a repair patch to replace that butchered portion.
After removing the sound deadening and old metal it looked like this.
P1030555 (1000 x 750).jpg
Fettled repair panel sitting over the now cleared original material.
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Here's what came out.
P1030556 (1000 x 750).jpg
Original metal remnants, distorted and rusty.
P1030556 (1000 x 750).jpg (219.09 KiB) Viewed 2425 times
Since the ecu is now basically sitting underneath this actual panel area, it made no sense to attempt to run a thick wire bundle inside the car, instead I produced a suitably sized hole and reinforced it with a steel ring behind it to support a heavy duty grommet to carry the wiring into the scuttle panel area.
Normally this area also has a plastic water shield over it so when I get a new one in place the wiring will be hidden and away from the elements.
P1030566 (1000 x 750).jpg
Repair panel with grommet for cable exit and reinforcing "ring" tacked on behind.
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P1030568 (1000 x 750).jpg
In place.
P1030568 (1000 x 750).jpg (170.83 KiB) Viewed 2425 times
After welding the panel in, I fettled the welds flush, and prepped the area for primer.
The paint was applied liberally so it would creep under the panel edges by capilliary action and seal it completely.
In any case once dry I seam sealed it and applied a new sound deadening patch using a hairdryer to make it a little more plastic and contoured to the panel under it.
P1030580 (1000 x 750).jpg
Painted panel, paint is actually dry at this point.
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P1030591 (1000 x 750).jpg
Sound deadening panel applied.
Looks much better now and is weatherproof.
P1030591 (1000 x 750).jpg (235.79 KiB) Viewed 2425 times
Tony Warren. GC #96.

4v6
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Re: Audi Quattro.

Post by 4v6 » Sun Sep 25, 2011 4:43 pm

With the scuttle area in a fit state, I could set about mounting up the ecu and the routing the required wires in the monstrous harness, removing any unnecessary ones and trying to figure out how to lay it all out.
It's complicated as on the S6 models there's a "rack" that secures all the wiring plugs, but since the harness isnt made for this vehicle, that's not an item I could make use of.
It did'nt really matter in the end as most of it has slotted in fairly easily, needing only two cables needing to be shortened and a couple lengthening.

Ecu now bolts up on the drivers side under the right side of the column.
P1030541 (1000 x 750).jpg
Ecu position.
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I like sphaghetti, just not this much of it in one go.
P1030577 (1000 x 750).jpg
Tangle of wires to trawl through.
P1030577 (1000 x 750).jpg (221.02 KiB) Viewed 2421 times
After a fair few hours under the dash and elsewhere, I managed to resolve that mass of wires to looking a little more reasonable.
The power output stages to power the ignition coils were mounted on a heavy gauge alloy plate to dissipate their heat, rears cleaned and smeared with heat sink compound to get good heat transfer.
P1030626 (1000 x 750).jpg
Much tidier now.
P1030626 (1000 x 750).jpg (167.51 KiB) Viewed 2421 times
I ran out of terminal crimps during all this some more are on order to finish off and then I can start testing the wiring.
I also powered up the vehicle wiring to check that for problems, I found several.
Most all were caused by previous bodges, scotchloks and shorts.
Eventually after much time spent i fired up the lights. There's life in the old beast!
P1030611 (1000 x 750).jpg
And then there was light.
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I managed to locate a brand new windscreen to replace the scored and grit peppered item, these are becoming hard to get as well as everything else on these cars it seems.
P1030592 (1000 x 750).jpg
New old stock windscreen with green tint strip across the top as per original.
P1030592 (1000 x 750).jpg (179.05 KiB) Viewed 2421 times
Tony Warren. GC #96.

4v6
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Re: Audi Quattro.

Post by 4v6 » Sun Sep 25, 2011 6:23 pm

Third in the installment of updates.

I decided to address the remainder of corrosion issues on the rear wheel arches.
Both of these trailing edges have suffered because of their location on the car but also because they've been drilled through at some point to remount the rear bumper/aprom which has parted the two layers and allowed water and salt in.
P1030707 (1000 x 750).jpg
Rust damage from years of exposure plus being drilled through.
P1030707 (1000 x 750).jpg (222.71 KiB) Viewed 2419 times
These are the three parts for the repair sections, two sets made up for both rear edges.
P1030687 (1000 x 750).jpg
Repair sections were easier than i thought to fabricate and weld in.
P1030687 (1000 x 750).jpg (172.62 KiB) Viewed 2419 times
After locating them and tacking them in, they're fully welded and plug welded through into each other like a spot weld and the welds flushed down.
P1030688 (1000 x 750).jpg
Tacked in.
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P1030720 (1000 x 750).jpg
Flushed welds.
P1030720 (1000 x 750).jpg (201.65 KiB) Viewed 2419 times
Then a couple of layers of por15 go on to seal it all off ready for undersealing/schutzing.
P1030699 (1000 x 750).jpg
Painted and sealed.
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P1030723 (1000 x 750).jpg
Offside.
P1030723 (1000 x 750).jpg (200.22 KiB) Viewed 2419 times
This cheeky little fellow is my nephew and partner in crime/helper.
On the day this photo was taken he was just barely 12 months old and had just stopped turning the rather larger than him steering wheel whilst pulling on the handbrake, changing gears and doing "brmm brmm" noises, I kid you not.
He absolutely loves the old Audi and whenever he gets the chance, makes me open the door so he can sit inside and pretend he's driving it.
One day doubtless he will have the car for himself.
P1020403 (1000 x 750).jpg
The getaway driver.
P1020403 (1000 x 750).jpg (157.7 KiB) Viewed 2419 times
Tony Warren. GC #96.

WhizzMan
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Re: Audi Quattro.

Post by WhizzMan » Mon Sep 26, 2011 7:19 am

How are you going to protect your spark amplifiers and the wiring loom grommet from rain getting in? Most cars have leafs and debris in that area blocking the water from getting out and before you know it, you will have your electronics flooded, or water coming in your ECU via the grommet and the loom. I'm sure you'll keep it clean there and park the car inside, but one big downpour and you could be in trouble.
Book #348

4v6
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Re: Audi Quattro.

Post by 4v6 » Mon Sep 26, 2011 9:00 am

WhizzMan wrote:How are you going to protect your spark amplifiers and the wiring loom grommet from rain getting in? Most cars have leafs and debris in that area blocking the water from getting out and before you know it, you will have your electronics flooded, or water coming in your ECU via the grommet and the loom. I'm sure you'll keep it clean there and park the car inside, but one big downpour and you could be in trouble.
Good question.
Luckily, the wiring connectors are all "hardened" against water ingress with internal seals as theyre in the engine bay along with the amplifiers on the S6 models anyway so I dont foresee any issues there to be fair.
The grommet is a nice tight fit and is sealed/glued to the panel beneath to keep water out.
That whole area is normally covered with a plastic shield that extends almost the width of the engine bay as the heater fan is mounted under there.
If you add in the sloping contour of the scuttle itself, water dosnt congregate underneath in that area as itd have to flow uphill, although the photos dont show it too well.

The only reason the previous "repair" leaked in was because that plastic shield was cracked , so i dont envisage any issues from the weather or from washing the vehicle.
Tony Warren. GC #96.

Guy Croft
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Re: Audi Quattro.

Post by Guy Croft » Mon Sep 26, 2011 10:15 am

I do like the handsome little soul in the driver's seat! So nice to see a 'human' touch here now and again.


G

4v6
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Re: Audi Quattro.

Post by 4v6 » Mon Sep 26, 2011 10:51 am

Thank you Guy, yes he is a proper little character.
Never ceases to amaze me just how bright he is for his age, I absolutely adore him.

Best wishes, Tony.
Tony Warren. GC #96.

4v6
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Re: Audi Quattro.

Post by 4v6 » Fri Dec 09, 2011 8:42 pm

In amongst the many items I've collected I've had a rear screen squirreled away.

It's a screen that very few of these cars has, with the word "quattro" embedded as part of the heater, its not found on all quattros, I know it's a fairly limited item but it looks nice when covered in ice and as it defrosts the word is revealed.
It's been a while since I removed a screen from a car of any description but as these aren't bonded in it made it a little easier, no mishaps either as these tend to bend a fair bit.
P1030793.jpg
"quattro" script as part of the rear heated window.
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I also decided to get the scored front screen out but these are a different proposition as they nearly always crack if you try to remove them incorrectly which is why most people tend to split the rubbers, a sin if ever as theyre so hard to come by and the screens aren't.
Once out I found a small couple of areas of very minor corrosion which I addressed, to be honest I expected worse so I was very happy to see it in such good condition beneath the seal.
P1030823.jpg
Worst corrosion I found under the seal and easy to deal with.
P1030823.jpg (199.18 KiB) Viewed 2298 times
Fitting the new screen was pretty simple with a length of cord inside the seal edge and with the screen in its place carefully pull the cord to cause the rubber to fold itself onto the aperture lip.
Then on cleaning the screen I found a nice score. Aww!
Looks like its been stood against a wall or grit and it's made a roughly 35mm scratch in the surface.
Not possible to take it back, it was second hand new old stock.
Didn't see it as it was under the plastic.
Only thing to do was to try to repair it.
P1030875.jpg
Scratched!
P1030875.jpg (116.21 KiB) Viewed 2298 times
I figured I could only do this one way and it was a bit of an unknown quantity, so I purchased a chip repair kit from halfords, read the instructions and set to work with it.
Luckily the sun was out when I did this job as the resin you use to fix the chips cures under UV light.
A couple of hours later and although its not invisible it is a sight better than it was previously and cannot be felt with a fingernail.
P1030880.jpg
Much better, not perfect but then neither is the rest of the car.
P1030880.jpg (183.32 KiB) Viewed 2298 times
During my excusions into the murky undersides of the car I decided it was high time to remove the old fuel lines in readiness for a new set.
Considering these have had high pressure fuel running through them I'm rather mystified as to how they haven't sprayed fuel everywhere as one simply fell apart in my hands upon removal.
P1030839.jpg
Leak free?
P1030839.jpg (134.02 KiB) Viewed 2298 times
Since I was under there, I also decided to get the brakes plumbed in along with the master cylinder.
Considering the quattro normally has a hydraulically assisted brake system, run off the power steering pump, I dont think this conversion to a more normal brake servo system has gone too badly.
It certainly fits in nicely enough.
P1030866 (1000 x 750).jpg
Plumbed in and fully functional brakes.
Another system almost finished.
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Because I've replaced most everything under there now and redone the underseal, it's actually quite a nice place to be, lying on your back looking upwards.
P1030813.jpg
New paint new everything...well pretty much.
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P1030802.jpg
Clean and tidy but the diff isn't in yet.
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P1040015.jpg
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It's strange to look back through all the photos I've taken of this project and it all seems so very long ago that I started it.
It's come a long way from this point, hopefully it'll not be too much longer before it's up and running.
S8006472.jpg
It's been a long time since it sat on its wheels.
S8006472.jpg (252.03 KiB) Viewed 2298 times
I know you like the human aspect Guy so here I am with the ( not so little now) nephew cleaning his moms car.
This was his first time with a hosepipe and sprayer, my hand's got the other side as he soon twigged there was almost unlimited fun to be had just by spraying me and not the car.
P1030764-1 (1000 x 750).jpg
This little fella is not to be trusted with a hosepipe!
P1030764-1 (1000 x 750).jpg (237.26 KiB) Viewed 2298 times
Tony Warren. GC #96.

Guy Croft
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Re: Audi Quattro.

Post by Guy Croft » Sat Dec 10, 2011 10:27 am

Very much enjoyed your latest update!

And yes I am all in favor of a wee soul having some fun with the hosepipe!!

G

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